Shales: Comprehensive Laboratory Characterization

  • Eduardo Gramajo

Student thesis: Doctoral Thesis

Abstract

Unconventional formations have become an increasingly important source of energy resources. Proper rock mechanic characterization is needed not only to identify the most promising areas for stimulation, but to increase our understanding of the sealing capabilities of cap-rock formations for carbon geological storage. However, shale assessment is challenging with current standard techniques. This research explores the index and rock mechanic properties of different shale specimens considered as source rocks for oil and gas (Eagle Ford, Wolfcamp, Jordanian, Mancos, Bakken, and Kimmeridge), and presents an in-depth analysis of tools and protocols to identify inherent biases. New test protocols proposed in this thesis provide robust and cost-effective measurement techniques to characterize shale formations in general; these include: 1) new energy methods computed from the area under the stress-strain curve or proposed boundary asymptotes (strength and stiffness) to assess brittle/ductile conditions in the field, 2) tensile strength analyses to determine anisotropy in shale formations, 3) Coda wave analysis to monitor pre-failure damage evolution during compression, and 4) a combination of index tests to anticipate the complicated geology or layered characteristics, which include high-resolution imaging, hardness, and scratch tests. Experimental results combined with extensive databases provide unprecedented information related to the mechanical behavior of shale formations needed for the enhanced design and analysis of geo-engineering applications. Calcareous shales display strong interlayer bonding and lower compressive strength anisotropy than siliceous shales. Tensile strength anisotropy is more pronounced than in compressive strength and reflects bedding orientation and loading conditions that affect fracture propagation and ensuing failure surface topography.
Date of AwardDec 2020
Original languageEnglish (US)
Awarding Institution
  • Physical Science and Engineering
SupervisorJ. Carlos Santamarina (Supervisor)

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