Understanding the initial stages of polymer grafting on metals: A photoelectron spectroscopy study of acrylonitrile adsorption on transition metal surfaces

X. Crispin*, R. Lazzaroni, A. Crispin, V. M. Geskin, Jean-Luc Bredas, W. R. Salaneck

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

X-ray and UV photoelectron spectroscopies show that acrylonitrile is chemisorbed on iron, nickel and copper polycrystalline surfaces via the carbon and nitrogen atoms. Depending on the conditions used, different adsorption geometries are found. The molecules can either be adsorbed flat on the surface and chemically bound by a (2pπ)-(3d/4s) overlap via both the C=C double bond and the C≡N nitrile group or they can be adsorbed perpendicular to the surface via a covalent interaction between the nitrogen lone pair and the 3d-4s levels of the metals. Analysis of the XPS data obtained on molecular mono-layers chemisorbed on metal surfaces emphasizes the importance of initial-state effects (charge transfer upon chemisorption, contribution of the metal surface dipole) and final-state effects (metal screening and polarization effect within the mono-layer). The correlation between the XPS and UPS data illustrates the importance of the metal surface dipole in understanding the workfunction changes upon molecular adsorption on metal surfaces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-74
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Electron Spectroscopy and Related Phenomena
Volume121
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001

Keywords

  • Chemisorption
  • Polymer grafting
  • Transition metals
  • Vinylic monomers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Radiation
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Spectroscopy
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Understanding the initial stages of polymer grafting on metals: A photoelectron spectroscopy study of acrylonitrile adsorption on transition metal surfaces'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this