Towards the next generation of solid oxide fuel cells operating below 600 °c with chemically stable proton-conducting electrolytes

Emiliana Fabbri, Lei Bi, Daniele Pergolesi, Enrico Traversa*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

368 Scopus citations

Abstract

The need for reducing the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operating temperature below 600 °C is imposed by cost reduction, which is essential for widespread SOFC use, but might also disclose new applications. To this aim, high-temperature proton-conducting (HTPC) oxides have gained widespread interest as electrolyte materials alternative to oxygen-ion conductors. This Progress Report describes recent developments in electrolyte, anode, and cathode materials for protonic SOFCs, addressing the issue of chemical stability, processability, and good power performance below 600 °C. Different fabrication methods are reported for anode-supported SOFCs, obtained using state-of-the-art, chemically stable proton-conducting electrolyte films. Recent findings show significant improvements in the power density output of cells based on doped barium zirconate electrolytes, pointing out towards the feasibility of the next generation of protonic SOFCs, including a good potential for the development of miniaturized SOFCs as portable power supplies. Recent developments in electrolyte, anode, and cathode materials for protonic SOFCs are here reported, addressing the issue of chemical stability, processability, and good power performance below 600 °C. Recent findings show significant improvements in the power density output of cells based on doped barium zirconate electrolytes, pointing out towards the feasibility of the next generation of protonic SOFCs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-208
Number of pages14
JournalAdvanced Materials
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 10 2012

Keywords

  • Solid oxide fuel cells
  • chemical stability
  • low operating temperature
  • proton-conducting oxides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

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