The effects of differently weighting interview scores on the admission of underrepresented minority medical students

Janine C. Edwards*, Filomeno G. Maldonado, James Arthur Calvin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose. Seeking to admit medical students who will later practice medicine in underserved areas, but faced with the national debate over affirmative action programs, the authors evaluate the effects that giving differ- ent weightings to academic and interview scores have upon the acceptance or rejection of certain applicants. Method. The authors reviewed the admission records of 439 applicants to Texas A and M University College of Medicine in 1996-97. They compared the applicants actually admitted (accepted under a formula that equally weighted the two scores) with applicants who would have been admitted if the formula had weighted the interview scores at either 60 % or 70% and the academic scores at either 40% or 30%. Results. Weighting the academic score at 40% and the interview score at 60% produced little change in the make-up of the admissions. Weighting the academic score at 30% and the interview score at 70%, however, would have resulted in offers of acceptance to three additional underrepresented minority applicants, two of whom were disadvantaged students. Conclusion. Readjusting the weights of the criteria by which applicants are offered admission to medical schools may help meet the goal of educating doctors who will practice in underserved communities. More research must be done to explore other adjustments to admission criteria.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-61
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Volume74
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effects of differently weighting interview scores on the admission of underrepresented minority medical students'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this