Subdivision-based multilevel methods for large scale engineering simulation of thin shells

Seth Green*, George Turkiyyah, Duane Storti

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper presents a multilevel algorithm to accelerate the numerical solution of thin shell finite element problems described by subdivision surfaces. Subdivision surfaces have become a widely used geometric representation for general curved three dimensional boundary models and thin shells as they provide a compact and robust framework for modeling 3D geometry. More recently, the shape functions used in the subdivision surfaces framework have been proposed as candidates for use as finite element basis functions in the analysis and simulation of the mechanical deformation of thin shell structures. When coupled with standard solvers, however, such simulations do not scale well. Run time costs associated with high-resolution simulations (105 degrees of freedom or more) become prohibitive. The main contribution of the paper is to show that the subdivision framework can be used for accelerating such simulations. Specifically the subdivision matrix is used as the intergrid information transfer operator in a multilevel pre-conditioner. The method described in the paper allows the practical simulation or a broad range of problems. Included examples show that the run time of the algorithm presented scales nearly linearly in time with problem size.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages265-272
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
EventProceddings Seventh ACM Symposium on Solid Modeling and Applications SM'02 - Saarbrucken, Germany
Duration: Jun 17 2002Jun 21 2002

Other

OtherProceddings Seventh ACM Symposium on Solid Modeling and Applications SM'02
CountryGermany
CitySaarbrucken
Period06/17/0206/21/02

Keywords

  • Multigrid
  • Multilevel
  • Multiresolution
  • Numerical Algorithm
  • Subdivision Surface
  • Thin Shell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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