Strong habitat and weak genetic effects shape the lifetime reproductive success in a wild clownfish population.

Océane C Salles, Glenn R Almany, Michael L. Berumen, Geoffrey P Jones, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Maya Srinivasan, Simon R Thorrold, Benoit Pujol, Serge Planes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The relative contributions of environmental, maternal and additive genetic factors to the Lifetime reproductive success (LRS) determine whether species can adapt to rapid environmental change. Yet to date, studies quantifying LRS across multiple generations in marine species in the wild are non-existent. Here we used 10-year pedigrees resolved for a wild orange clownfish population from Kimbe Island (PNG) and a quantitative genetic linear mixed model approach to quantify the additive genetic, maternal and environmental contributions to variation in LRS for the self-recruiting portion of the population. We found that the habitat of the breeder, including the anemone species and geographic location, made the greatest contribution to LRS. There were low to negligible contributions of genetic and maternal factors equating with low heritability and evolvability. Our findings imply that our population will be susceptible to short-term, small-scale changes in habitat structure and may have limited capacity to adapt to these changes.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-273
Number of pages9
JournalEcology letters
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 26 2019

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