Standardized Gasoline Compression Ignition Fuels Matrix

Jihad Badra, Radwan Bakor, Abdullah AlRamadan, Mohammed Almansour, Jaeheon Sim, Ahfaz Ahmed, Yoann Viollet, Junseok Chang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Direct injection compression ignition engines running on gasoline-like fuels have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition and diesel engines. The compression and lean combustion mode eliminates throttle losses yielding higher thermodynamic efficiencies and the better mixing of fuel/air due to the longer ignition delay times of the gasoline-like fuels allows better emission performance such as nitric oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM). These gasoline-like fuels which usually have lower octane compared to market gasoline have been identified as a viable option for the gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engine applications due to its lower reactivity and lighter evaporation compared to diesel. The properties, specifications and sources of these GCI fuels are not fully understood yet because this technology is relatively new. In this work, a GCI fuel matrix is being developed based on the significance of certain physical and chemical properties in GCI engine operation. Those properties were chosen to be density, temperature at 90 volume % evaporation (T90) or final boiling point (FBP) and research octane number (RON) and the ranges of these properties were determined from the data reported in literature. These proposed fuels were theoretically formulated, while applying realistic constraints, using species present in real refinery streams. Finally, three-dimensional (3D) engine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed using the proposed GCI fuels and the similarities and differences were highlighted.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSAE Technical Paper Series
PublisherSAE International
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2018

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