Split-beam target tracking can be used to study the swimming behaviour of deep-living plankton in situ

Thor A. Klevjer*, Stein Kaartvedt

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

A scattering layer consisting mainly of krill (Meganyctiphanes norvegica) was studied with a submersible transducer, to assess the behaviour of individual organisms in situ by means of split-beam target tracking. Individuals were resolved and tracked, but a rapid increase in average swimming speeds with depth suggested that inaccuracies in the angular estimates affected the estimates. Attempts were made to smooth the tracks during post-processing. Smoothed speeds suggested that most (>78%) invertebrates swam at speeds below 12 cm s-1 (mode ∼4 cm s-1), with components of speed larger in the horizontal plane than in the vertical.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-298
Number of pages6
JournalAquatic Living Resources
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2003
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Behaviour
  • Invertebrate
  • Speed
  • Swimming
  • Target tracking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science

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