Resonance fluorescence imaging of CH in hydrocarbon flames using a polaroid filter to reject Rayleigh scattered light

R. W. Dibble*, R. L. Schmitt, R. S. Barlow

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Electronic imaging of laser induced fluorescence from a plane of laser light that intersects a reactive flow is becoming commonplace. Quite often, the fluorescence wavelength is longer than the laser excitation wavelength and hence the fluorescence is easily discriminated from the Rayleigh and Mie scattering, which is at the laser wavelength. In the case of resonance fluorescence, the fluorescence is sufficiently near the laser excitation wavelength that low fluorescent signals are obscured by Rayleigh and Mie scattering. However, recognizing that the fluorescence scattering is weakly polarized while the Rayleigh scattering light is strongly polarized suggests that a polaroid filter could improve the signal to noise by eliminating Rayleigh scattered light and passing half of the fluorescent scattered light. By rotating the polaroid filter, any amount of Rayleigh scattering and resonance fluorescence from CH as it occurs in the flame front of premixed methane flames.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Editors Anon
PublisherPubl by Int Soc for Optical Engineering
Volume1404
ISBN (Print)0912035390
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes
EventICALEO '89 - Optical Methods in Flow and Particle Diagnostics - Orlando, FL, USA
Duration: Oct 15 1989Oct 20 1989

Other

OtherICALEO '89 - Optical Methods in Flow and Particle Diagnostics
CityOrlando, FL, USA
Period10/15/8910/20/89

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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