Resistance of pea roots to endomycorrhizal fungus or Rhizobium correlates with enhanced levels of endogenous salicylic acid

Ikram Blilou, Juan A. Ocampo, José M. García-Garrido*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

91 Scopus citations

Abstract

The analysis of SA accumulation in roots of plant symbiotic mutants revealed two independent phenomena associated with the inability of either the plant or the microsymbiont to form a compatible symbiosis. SA accumulation in roots of the wild type and symbiosis-resistant P2 (Nod-, Myc-) Pisum sativum genotypes was induced upon interaction with Glomus mosseae. The amplitude of this accumulation was higher in P2 plants and increased with time, an effect that was not observed in roots of the wild-type P. sativum genotype. Likewise, Rhizobium leguminosarum wild type or a mutant blocked in Nod factor biosynthesis induced SA accumulation in P2, whereas SA accumulation in roots of the wild-type plant was dependent on the inability of the bacterium to produce Nod factors. These results suggest that the sym30 gene, which is mutated in P2 plants, could be implicated in a common pathway that leads to the suppression of an SA-dependent defence mechanism in legume plants against Rhizobium and endomycorrhizal fungi, thus allowing establishment of symbiosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1663-1668
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Experimental Botany
Volume50
Issue number340
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Arbuscular mycorrhiza
  • Plant defence
  • Resistance
  • Rhizobia
  • Salicylic acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Plant Science

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