Nonlinear optical properties of bacteriorhodopsin, retinal, and related molecules

Eric Hendrickx*, Koen J. Clays, A. Vinckier, Andre P. Persoons, Christophe Dehu, Jean-Luc Bredas

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

The first hyperpolarizabilities, β, of bacteriorhodopsin, retinal, and related molecules were determined experimentally by using the hyper-Rayleigh scattering technique and compared to the calculated values obtained with the semiempirical intermediate neglect of differential overlap/configuration interaction/sum-over-states method. The experimental and theoretical results are in excellent mutual agreeement. The hyper-Rayleigh scattering technique is shown to be very sensitive to the degree of solubilization of bacteriorhodopsin. Theoretical and experimental data confirm the expected dependence of β on the first transition energy as well as an exponential increase of β with the number of double bonds. It was found that, upon trans to 13-cis or 9-cis isomerization of a retinal double bond, a constant fraction of the β value is lost, regardless of the nature of the electron withdrawing group or the solvent of choice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsGustaaf R. Moehlmann
Pages180-189
Number of pages10
StatePublished - Dec 1 1995
EventNonlinear Optical Properties of Organic Materials VIII - San Diego, CA, USA
Duration: Jul 11 1995Jul 13 1995

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume2527
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Other

OtherNonlinear Optical Properties of Organic Materials VIII
CitySan Diego, CA, USA
Period07/11/9507/13/95

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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