Network modules uncover mechanisms of skeletal muscle dysfunction in COPD patients

Ákos Tényi, Isaac Cano, Francesco Marabita, Narsis Kiani, Susana G. Kalko, Esther Barreiro, Pedro Atauri, Marta Cascante, David Gomez-Cabrero, Josep Roca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients often show skeletal muscle dysfunction that has a prominent negative impact on prognosis. The study aims to further explore underlying mechanisms of skeletal muscle dysfunction as a characteristic systemic effect of COPD, potentially modifiable with preventive interventions (i.e. muscle training). The research analyzes network module associated pathways and evaluates the findings using independent measurements. Methods: We characterized the transcriptionally active network modules of interacting proteins in the vastus lateralis of COPD patients (n = 15, FEV 1 46 ± 12% pred, age 68 ± 7 years) and healthy sedentary controls (n = 12, age 65 ± 9 years), at rest and after an 8-week endurance training program. Network modules were functionally evaluated using experimental data derived from the same study groups. Results: At baseline, we identified four COPD specific network modules indicating abnormalities in creatinine metabolism, calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, showing statistically significant associations with exercise capacity (VO 2 peak, Watts peak, BODE index and blood lactate levels) (P < 0.05 each), but not with lung function (FEV 1 ). Training-induced network modules displayed marked differences between COPD and controls. Healthy subjects specific training adaptations were significantly associated with cell bioenergetics (P < 0.05) which, in turn, showed strong relationships with training-induced plasma metabolomic changes; whereas, effects of training in COPD were constrained to muscle remodeling. Conclusion: In summary, altered muscle bioenergetics appears as the most striking finding, potentially driving other abnormal skeletal muscle responses.
Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Translational Medicine
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 20 2018
Externally publishedYes

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