Modeling air pollution from the collapse of the World Trade Center and assessing the potential impacts on human exposures

Alan Huber*, Panos Georgopoulos, Robert Gilliam, Gera Stenchikov, Sheng Wei Wang, Bob Kelly, Henry Feingersh

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prior to 9/11, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Exposure Reseach Laboratory (NERL) and the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) had a University Partnership Agrement to develop improved methods for human exposure modeling. The experience of the WTC site has increased the awareness that there are scientific shortcomings in performing eposure modeling of air pollution event sin urban environments and in providing timely modeling support. The larger purpose of ongoing modeling developments and applications is to provide support for future homeland security concerns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-40
Number of pages6
JournalEM: Air and Waste Management Association's Magazine for Environmental Managers
Issue numberFEB.
StatePublished - Feb 2004
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Waste Management and Disposal

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