Lyophilization for water recovery

Eric Litwiller*, Martin Reinhard, Michael Flynn, John Fisher

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

An energy-efficient lyophilization technique is being developed to recover water from highly contaminated spacecraft waste streams. In the lyophilization process, water in an aqueous waste is frozen and then sublimed, separating the waste into a dried solid material and liquid water. This technology is ideally suited to applications such as the Mars Reference Mission, where water recovery rates approaching 100% are desirable but production of CO2 is not. Candidate wastes include feces, concentrated brines from water processors, and other solid wastes that contain water. To operate in microgravity, and to minimize power consumption, thermoelectric heat pumps can be used in place of traditional fluid cycle heat pumps. A mathematical model of a thermoelectric lyophilizer is described and used to generate energy use and processing rate estimates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication31st International Conference on Environmental Systems
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes
Event31st International Conference on Environmental Systems - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Jul 9 2001Jul 12 2001

Other

Other31st International Conference on Environmental Systems
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period07/9/0107/12/01

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Automotive Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Pollution
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

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