Investigation of the hydrodynamic expansion following a Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed discharge in air

Da A. Xu*, Deanna A. Lacoste, Diane L. Rusterholtz, Christophe O. Laux

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

We report on an experimental study of the hydrodynamic expansion following a Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed (NRP) discharge in atmospheric pressure air at 300 and 1000 K. The discharge is created by voltage pulses of amplitude 10 kV, duration 10 ns, applied at a frequency of 1-10 kHz between two pin electrodes. The electrical energy of each pulse is of the order of 1 mJ. We recorded single-shot schlieren images starting from 50 nanosecond after the discharge. The time-resolved images show the shock-wave propagation and the expansion of the heated gas channel. The temporal evolution of the gas temperature behind the shock front is estimated from the measured shock-wave velocity by using the Rankine-Hugoniot relations. The results show that the gas heats up by almost 1100 K within 50 ns after the pulse. This fast gas heating is consistent with a two-step mechanism involving electron-impact excitation of N2 followed by the dissociative quenching of the excited electronic states of N2 by O2.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication50th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting Including the New Horizons Forum and Aerospace Exposition
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
Event50th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting Including the New Horizons Forum and Aerospace Exposition - Nashville, TN, United States
Duration: Jan 9 2012Jan 12 2012

Other

Other50th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting Including the New Horizons Forum and Aerospace Exposition
CountryUnited States
CityNashville, TN
Period01/9/1201/12/12

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aerospace Engineering

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