Inclusion of gold nanoparticles in meso-porous silicon for the SERS analysis of cell adhesion on nano-structured surfaces

M.L. Coluccio, S. De Vitis, G. Strumbo, P. Candeloro, G. Perozziello, Enzo M. Di Fabrizio, F. Gentile

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The study and the comprehension of the mechanism of cell adhesion and cell interaction with a substrate is a key point when biology and medicine meet engineering. This is the case of several biomedical applications, from regenerative medicine and tissue engineering to lab on chip and many others, in which the realization of the appropriate artificial surface allows the control of cell adhesion and proliferation. In this context, we aimed to design and develop a fabrication method of mesoporous (MeP) silicon substrates, doped with gold nanoparticles, in which we combine the capability of porous surfaces to support cell adhesion with the SERS capabilities of gold nanoparticles, to understand the chemical mechanisms of cell/surface interaction. MeP Si surfaces were realized by anodization of a Si wafer, creating the device for cell adhesion and growth. Gold nanoparticles were deposited on porous silicon by an electroless technique. We thus obtained devices with superior SERS capabilities, whereby cell activity may be controlled using Raman spectroscopy. MCF-7 breast cancer cells were cultured on the described substrates and SERS maps revealing the different expression and distribution of adhesion molecules were obtained by Raman spectroscopic analyses.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-106
Number of pages5
JournalMicroelectronic Engineering
Volume158
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 26 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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