Immobilization of trypsin onto "molded" macroporous poly(glycidyl methacrylateco-ethylene dimethacrylate) rods and use of the conjugates as bioreactors and for affinity chromatography

Miroslav Petro, Frantisek Svec, Jean Frechet*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

179 Scopus citations

Abstract

Trypsin immobilization onto continuous "molded" rods of porous poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimeth-acrylate) and some applications of the conjugate have been studied. The rods polymerized within a tubular mold (chromatographic column), were treated in situ with ethylenediamine, activated with glutaraldehyde and finally modified with trypsin. The performance of the trypsinmodified rods was evaluated and compared to that of poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) beads, modified with the same enzyme. Overall the enzyme-modified rods performed substantially better than the corresponding beads. In particular, the performance of the molded supports as enzymatic reactors or as chromatographic media benefits greatly from the enhanced mass transfer that is characteristic of the molded rod at high flow rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-363
Number of pages9
JournalBiotechnology and Bioengineering
Volume49
Issue number4
StatePublished - Feb 20 1996

Keywords

  • Affinity chromatography
  • Immobilization
  • Molded support
  • Poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate)
  • Porous materials
  • Trypsin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

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