Hole and electron transport in poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole)

Theo Kreouzis, Donal D.C. Bradley, Alasdair J. Campbell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Time-of-flight photocurrent (TOF) measurements on the blue emitting electroluminescent polymer poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) show that the room temperature hole mobility can vary from 10-2 to 5×10 -5 cm2/Vs depending on how the polymer films are prepared. It also undergoes irreversible increases when the samples are annealed. These results can be related to PFOs complex phase behaviour and show the importance of understanding and controlling the polymer film structure for device applications. We also present new TOF measurements on the green emitting electroluminescent polymer poly(9,9-diocrylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (BT). Previous TOF measurements have shown that BT exhibits dispersive electron transport and that holes are very heavily trapped, no hole transport signal being measurable using this technique. The new TOF measurements on a recently synthesized batch of BT show less dispersive electron transport with a mobility of 10-3 cm2Vs as well as non-dispersive hole transport with a mobility of 2×103 cm2/Vs. This new batch therefore exhibits the highly desirable property of both good electron and hole transport in the same electroluminescent polymer. It is proposed that this is due to a change in the molecular weight and/or polydispersity of the material and indicates the importance of further development of relatively well known materials. TOF measurements of the variation of the hole and electron mobility with temperature are examined within the framework of the Gaussian disorder model.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
DOIs
StatePublished - May 3 2004
Externally publishedYes

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