Flow cytometric bacterial cell counts challenge conventional heterotrophic plate counts for routine microbiological drinking water monitoring

S. Van Nevel, S. Koetzsch, C.R. Proctor, M.D. Besmer, E.I. Prest, Johannes S. Vrouwenvelder, A. Knezev, N. Boon, F. Hammes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

101 Scopus citations

Abstract

Drinking water utilities and researchers continue to rely on the century-old heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) method for routine assessment of general microbiological water quality. Bacterial cell counting with flow cytometry (FCM) is one of a number of alternative methods that challenge this status quo and provide an opportunity for improved water quality monitoring. After more than a decade of application in drinking water research, FCM methodology is optimised and established for routine application, supported by a considerable amount of data from multiple full-scale studies. Bacterial cell concentrations obtained by FCM enable quantification of the entire bacterial community instead of the minute fraction of cultivable bacteria detected with HPC (typically 
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-206
Number of pages16
JournalWater Research
Volume113
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 8 2017

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