Fast non-contact surface roughness measurements up to the micrometer range by dual-wavelength digital holographic microscopy

Jonas Kühn*, Eduardo Solanas, Sébastien Bourquin, Jean François Blaser, Luca Dorigatti, Thierry Keist, Yves Emery, Christian Depeursinge

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

We present fast high-roughness and non-contact surface measurements by digital holographic microscopy (DHM). By using single- and dual-wavelength operation modes, coupled with advanced image stitching and non-measured points management methods, the technique enables two-dimensional roughness measurements up to the micrometer (N6). The sample is mechanically scanned over a surface up to 5 × 0.3 mm2 with 17 holograms each acquired in less than 500 μs, the corresponding phase images stitched together by software, and therefore providing multiple profiles measurement in the ISO definition in less than 30 s. The approach is validated by inspection of several different roughness standards and our technique is demonstrated to be in agreement with two existing well-known techniques in the field.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationOptical Micro- and Nanometrology III
Volume7718
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes
EventOptical Micro- and Nanometrology III - Brussels, Belgium
Duration: Apr 13 2010Apr 16 2010

Other

OtherOptical Micro- and Nanometrology III
CountryBelgium
CityBrussels
Period04/13/1004/16/10

Keywords

  • digital holography
  • interferometry
  • microscopy
  • phase imaging
  • surface metrology
  • Surface roughness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Fast non-contact surface roughness measurements up to the micrometer range by dual-wavelength digital holographic microscopy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this