Extensions of goal-oriented error estimation methods to simulations of highly-nonlinear response of shock-loaded elastomer-reinforced structures

David Fuentes, David Littlefield, J. Tinsley Oden, Serge Prudhomme*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper describes extensions of goal-oriented methods for a posteriori error estimation and control of numerical approximation to a class of highly-nonlinear problems in computational solid mechanics. An updated Lagrangian formulation of the dynamical, large-deformation response of structures composed of strain-rate-sensitive elastomers and elastoplastic materials is developed. To apply the theory of goal-oriented error estimation, a backward-in-time dual formulation of these problems is derived, and residual error estimators for meaningful quantities of interest are established. The target problem class is that of axisymmetric deformations of layered elastomer-reinforced shells-of-revolution subjected to shock loading. Extensive numerical results on solutions of representative problems are given. It is shown that extensions of the theory of goal-oriented error estimation can be developed and applied effectively to a class of highly-nonlinear, multi-physics problems in solid and structural mechanics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4659-4680
Number of pages22
JournalComputer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering
Volume195
Issue number37-40
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2006

Keywords

  • A posteriori error estimation
  • Dual problem
  • Goal-oriented error estimation
  • Nonlinear continuum mechanics
  • Shock loading

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computational Mechanics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Computer Science Applications

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