Exploring Nanofibrous Self-assembling Peptide Hydrogels Using Mouse Myoblast Cells for three-dimensional Bioprinting and Tissue Engineering Applications

Wafaa Arab, Kowther Kahin, Zainab Khan, Charlotte Hauser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Injured skeletal muscles which lose more than 20% of their volume, known as volumetric muscle loss, can no longer regenerate cells through self-healing. The traditional solution for recovery is through regenerative therapy. As the technology of three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting continues to advance, a new approach for tissue transplantation is using biocompatible materials arranged in 3D scaffolds for muscle repair. Ultrashort self-assembling peptide hydrogels compete as a potential biomaterial for muscle tissue formation due to their biocompatibility. In this study, two sequences of ultrashort peptides were analyzed with muscle myoblast cells (C2C12) for cell viability, cell proliferation, and differentiation in 3D cell culture. The peptides were then extruded through a custom-designed robotic 3D bioprinter to create cell-laden 3D structures. These constructs were also analyzed for cell viability through live/dead assay. Results showed that 3D bioprinted structures of peptide hydrogels could be used as tissue platforms for myotube formation – a process necessary for muscle repair.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)74-82
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Bioprinting
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 26 2019

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