Evaluation of Energy Balance, Combination, and Complementary schemes for estimation of evaporation

A. Ershadi*, Matthew McCabe, J. P. Evans, J. P. Walker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

A comparison between three basic techniques for estimation of actual evapotranspiration, namely: the Energy Balance, the Combination, and the Complementary approaches, is undertaken. We utilize Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) as a framework for the energy balance method, the single-layer Penman-Monteith method for the combination approach, and the Advection-Aridity method as the complementary approach. Data from three flux tower stations are used to evaluate model estimated heat fluxes at short time steps. The results indicate advantages and/or limitations of each method under different conditions, highlighting issues in application of the Advection-Aridity technique in dry conditions and energy balance methods over sparse canopies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHydro-Climatology
Subtitle of host publicationVariability and Change
Pages52-56
Number of pages5
StatePublished - Nov 25 2011
EventHydro-climatology - Variability and Change Symposium, part of the 25th International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics General Assembly, IUGG 2011 - Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Duration: Jun 28 2011Jul 7 2011

Publication series

NameIAHS-AISH Publication
Volume344
ISSN (Print)0144-7815

Other

OtherHydro-climatology - Variability and Change Symposium, part of the 25th International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics General Assembly, IUGG 2011
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne, VIC
Period06/28/1107/7/11

Keywords

  • Advection-Aridity method
  • Energy balance
  • Evaluation
  • Evapotranspiration
  • Penman-Monteith

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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