Effect of pressure, environment temperature, jet velocity and nitrogen dilution on the liftoff characteristics of a N2-in-H2jet flame in a vitiated co-flow

A. North*, M. Magar, J. Y. Chen, Robert Dibble, A. Gruber

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The CO2 emission prevention advantage of generating power with high hydrogen content fuels using gas turbines motivates an improved understanding of the ignition behavior of hydrogen in premixed and partially premixed environments. Hydrogen rich fueled flame stability is sensitive to operating conditions, including environment pressure, temperature, and jet velocity. Furthermore, when premixed or partially premixed operation is needed for nitric oxide emissions reduction, a diluent, such as nitrogen, is often added in allowing fuel/air mixing prior to combustion. Thus, the concentration of the diluent added is an additional independent variable on which fame stability dependence is needed. The focus of this research is on characterizing the dependence of hydrogen jet flame stability on environment temperature, pressure, jet velocity and diluent concentration by determining the dependence of the liftoff height of lifted flames on these 4 independent parameters. Nitrogen is used as the diluent due to its availability and effectiveness in promoting liftoff. A correlation modeling the liftoff height dependence on operating conditions is developed which emphasizes the factors that bear the greatest impact on ignition behavior. Keywords

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-148
Number of pages8
JournalEurasian Chemico-Technological Journal
Volume16
Issue number2-3
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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