Effect of capillary cross-section geometry and size on the separation of proteins in gradient mode using monolithic poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) columns

Ivo Nischang, Frantisek Svec, Jean Frechet*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

Porous polymer monoliths have been prepared in capillaries with circular or square cross-sections and lateral dimensions of 50, 75, 100 μm as well as in a rectangular 38 μm × 95 μm capillary. These capillaries have been used to determine the effect of the size and shape of their cross-section on the porous and hydrodynamic properties of poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monoliths. The capillaries were studied by scanning electron microscopy and evaluated for their permeability to flow and their performance in the liquid chromatographic separation of a protein mixture comprising ribonuclease A, cytochrome c, myoglobin, and ovalbumin using a linear gradient of acetonitrile in the mobile phase. No differences resulting from channel geometry were found for the various capillary columns. These results demonstrate that standard capillaries with circular geometry are a good and affordable alternative conduit for modeling the processes carried out in microfluidic chips with a variety of geometries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2355-2361
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Chromatography A
Volume1216
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 20 2009

Keywords

  • Conduit shape
  • Nano-LC
  • Porous polymer monolith
  • Proteins
  • Reversed phase HPLC
  • Scalability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Biochemistry
  • Organic Chemistry

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