Dual-mode digital holographic and fluorescence microscopy for the study of morphological changes in cells under simulated microgravity

M. Fatih Toy, Christophe Pache, Jérôme Parent, Jonas Kühn, Marcel Egli, Christian Depeursinge

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

A dual mode microscope is developed to study morphological evolution of mouse myoblast cells under simulated microgravity in real time. Microscope operates in Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) and widefield epifluorescence microscopy modes in a time sequential basis. DHM provides information on real time cellular morphology. EGFP transfected actin filaments in mouse myoblast cells function as the reporter for the fluorescence microscopy mode. Experimental setup is fixed in the RPM to observe microgravity induced dynamic changes in live cells. Initial results revealed two different modifications. Disorganized structures become visible in the formed lamellipodias, and proteins accumulate in the perinuclear region.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThree-Dimensional and Multidimensional Microscopy
Subtitle of host publicationImage Acquisition and Processing XVII
Volume7570
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes
EventThree-Dimensional and Multidimensional Microscopy: Image Acquisition and Processing XVII - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 25 2010Jan 28 2010

Other

OtherThree-Dimensional and Multidimensional Microscopy: Image Acquisition and Processing XVII
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period01/25/1001/28/10

Keywords

  • Cell morphology
  • Cytoskeleton
  • Digital holographic microscopy
  • Fluorescence microscopy
  • Holography
  • Microgravity
  • Microscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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