Dissolved primary production and the strength of phytoplankton-bacterioplankton coupling in contrasting marine regions

Xose Anxelu G. Moran*, M. Estrada, J. M. Gasol, C. Pedrós-Alió

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

122 Scopus citations

Abstract

We analyzed the strength of phytoplankton-bacterioplankton coupling by comparing the rate of particulate (PPP) and dissolved primary production (DPP) with bacterial carbon demand (BCD) in four contrasting marine regions: offshore and coastal waters of the Southern Ocean, a coastal area of the NE Atlantic, and a coastal-offshore transect in the NW Mediterranean. We measured bacterial heterotrophic production (BHP) and estimated BCD from a literature model. Average phytoplanktonic percent extracellular release [PER = DPP/(DPP + PPP)] was 18-20% in the Antarctic (offshore and coastal, respectively), 16% in the NW Mediterranean, and 7% in the NE Atlantic. A significant inverse relationship was found between PER and total system productivity with pooled data. On average BHP amounted to <5% of total primary production in all regions. However, the strength of phytoplankton-bacterioplankton coupling, estimated as the potential importance of DPP in meeting BCD, differed greatly in the four regions. DPP was highly correlated to BCD in offshore Antarctic waters and was sufficient to meet BCD. In contrast, BCD exceeded DPP and bore no significant relationship in the remaining regions. The data suggest that a strong dependence of bacteria on algal extracellular production is only expected in openocean environments isolated from coastal inputs of DOC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-223
Number of pages7
JournalMicrobial Ecology
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Soil Science

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