Display considerations for improved night vision performance

Allan G. Rempel*, Rafal Mantiuk, Wolfgang Heidrich

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Most displays viewed in dark environments can easily cause dazzling glare and affect a viewer's dark adaptation state (night vision). In previous work we showed that legibility could be improved and dark adaptation preserved in low-light environments by using a display design with a specially selected spectral light emission. We used long-wavelength light (red) that is easily visible to daylight vision photoreceptors (cones) but almost invisible to night vision photoreceptors (rods). In this paper we conduct an experiment in which we show that negative polarity (bright text on a dark background) produces better performance in a legibility task than does positive polarity (dark text on a bright background). Our results can serve as a guidelines for designing displays that change their color scheme at low ambient light levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication19th Color Imaging Conference
Subtitle of host publicationColor Science and Engineering Systems, Technologies, and Applications - Final Program and Proceedings, CIC19
Pages191-194
Number of pages4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011
Event19th Color Imaging Conference: Color Science and Engineering Systems, Technologies, and Applications, CIC19 - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Nov 7 2011Nov 11 2011

Publication series

NameFinal Program and Proceedings - IS and T/SID Color Imaging Conference
ISSN (Print)1083-1304

Other

Other19th Color Imaging Conference: Color Science and Engineering Systems, Technologies, and Applications, CIC19
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period11/7/1111/11/11

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Display considerations for improved night vision performance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this