Culturable bacterial symbionts isolated from two distinct sponge species (Pseudoceratina clavata and Rhabdastrella globostellata) from the Great Barrier Reef display similar phylogenetic diversity

Feras Fawzi Lafi, Mary J. Garson, John A. Fuerst*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

57 Scopus citations

Abstract

The diversity of the culturable microbial communities was examined in two sponge species-Pseudoceratina clavata and Rhabdastrella globostellata. Isolates were characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The bacterial community structures represented in both sponges were found to be similar at the phylum level by the same four phyla in this study and also at a finer scale at the species level in both Firmicutes and Alphaproteobacteria. The majority of the Alphaproteobacteria isolates were most closely related to isolates from other sponge species including alpha proteobacterium NW001 sp. and alpha proteobacterium MBIC3368. Members of the low %G + C gram-positive (phylum Firmicutes), high %G + C gram-positive (phylum Actinobacteria), and Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides (phylum Bacteroidetes) phyla of domain Bacteria were also represented in both sponges. In terms of culturable organisms, taxonomic diversity of the microbial community in the two sponge species displays similar structure at phylum level. Within phyla, isolates often belonged to the same genus-level monophyletic group. Community structure and taxonomic composition in the two sponge species P. clavata and Rha. globostellata share significant features with those of other sponge species including those from widely separated geographical and climatic regions of the sea.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-220
Number of pages8
JournalMicrobial Ecology
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Ecology
  • Microbiology

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