Compositional modeling of fractured reservoirs without transfer functions by the discontinuous Galerkin and mixed methods

Hussein Hoteit, A. Firoozabadi

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

In a recent work, we introduced a numerical approach that combines the mixed finite element (MFE) and the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods for compositional modeling in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media. In this work, we extend our numerical approach to fractured media. We use the discrete fracture model (crossflow equilibrium) to approximate the two-phase flow with mass transfer in fractured media. The discrete fracture model is numerically superior to the single-porosity model and overcomes limitations of the dual-porosity model including the use of a shape factor. The MFE method is used to solve the pressure equation where the concept of total velocity is invoked. The DG method associated with a slope limiter is used to approximate the species balance equations. The cell-based finite volume schemes that are adapted to a discrete fracture model have deficiency in computing the fracturefracture fluxes across three and higher intersecting fracture branches. In our work, the problem is solved definitively due to the MFE formulation. Several numerical examples in fractured and unfractured media are presented to demonstrate the superiority of our approach to the classical finite difference and finite volume methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages2107-2119
Number of pages13
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004
Event2004 SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition - Houston, TX, United States
Duration: Sep 26 2004Sep 29 2004

Other

Other2004 SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition
CountryUnited States
CityHouston, TX
Period09/26/0409/29/04

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Fuel Technology
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology

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