Comparison between in-cylinder PIV measurements, CFD simulations and steady-flow impulse torque swirl meter measurements

Henrik Nordgren*, Leif Hildingsson, Bengt Johansson, Lars Dahlén, Dennis Konstanzer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

In-cylinder flow measurements, conventional swirl measurements and CFD-simulations have been performed and then compared. The engine studied is a single cylinder version of a Scania D12 that represents a modern heavy-duty truck size engine. Bowditch type optical access and flat piston is used. The cylinder head was also measured in a steady-flow impulse torque swirl meter. From the two-dimensional flow-field, which was measured in the interval from -200°ATDC to 65°ATDC at two different positions from the cylinder head, calculations of the vorticity, turbulence and swirl were made. A maximum in swirl occurs at about 50°before TDC while the maximum vorticity and turbulence occurs somewhat later during the compression stroke. The swirl centre is also seen moving around and it does not coincide with the geometrical centre of the cylinder. The simulated flow-field shows similar behaviour as that seen in the measurements. The steady-flow impulse torque swirl meter measurements compared with swirl calculated from PIV-measurement and CFD simulations gives better understanding of the common way of swirl measuring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2003
EventPowertrain and Fluid Systems Conference and Exhibition - Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Duration: Oct 27 2003Oct 30 2003

Other

OtherPowertrain and Fluid Systems Conference and Exhibition
CountryUnited States
CityPittsburgh, PA
Period10/27/0310/30/03

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Automotive Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Pollution
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

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