Biomass and dynamics of Thalassia testudinum in the Mexican Caribbean: elucidating rhizome growth

M. E. Gallegos, M. Merino, N. Marba, C. M. Duarte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

87 Scopus citations

Abstract

Turtlegrass was able to reach high biomass (>1000 g dry wt m -2) and develop highly productive populations (1500-4500 g dry wt m-2 annually, of which 10% were allocated to the rhizomes. The plants appeared to grow slowly, as reflected in longer time intervals in between production of leaves and shoots, and slower rhizome elongation rates and leaf production rates than found in the past, possibly as a result of their low nutrient, particularly phosphorus, content. Calculated maximum shoot life spans ranged between 6-9 yr, shoot recruitment rates ranged from 0.02-0.07 ln units per plastochrone interval (PI) and shoot mortality rate was substantial and averaged c0.045 ln units PI-1. Shoots turned over at c0.6 yr-1, which also represents the rhizome turnover rate. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)185-192
Number of pages8
JournalMarine Ecology Progress Series
Volume95
Issue number1-2
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology

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