Assessment and improvement of the pattern recognition performance of memdiode-based cross-point arrays with randomly distributed stuck-at-faults

Fernando L. Aguirre, Sebastián M. Pazos, Félix Palumbo, Antoni Morell, Jordi Suñé, Enrique Miranda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this work, the effect of randomly distributed stuck-at faults (SAFs) in memristive crosspoint array (CPA)-based single and multi-layer perceptrons (SLPs and MLPs, respectively) intended for pattern recognition tasks is investigated by means of realistic SPICE simulations. The quasi-static memdiode model (QMM) is considered here for the modelling of the synaptic weights implemented with memristors. Following the standard memristive approach, the QMM comprises two coupled equations, one for the electron transport based on the double-diode equation with a single series resistance and a second equation for the internal memory state of the device based on the so-called logistic hysteron. By modifying the state parameter in the current-voltage characteristic, SAFs of different severeness are simulated and the final outcome is analysed. Supervised ex-situ training and two well-known image datasets involving hand-written digits and human faces are employed to assess the inference accuracy of the SLP as a function of the faulty device ratio. The roles played by the memristor’s electrical parameters, line resistance, mapping strategy, image pixelation, and fault type (stuck-at-ON or stuck-at-OFF) on the CPA performance are statistically analysed following a Monte-Carlo approach. Three different re-mapping schemes to help mitigate the effect of the SAFs in the SLP inference phase are thoroughly investigated.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2427
JournalElectronics (Switzerland)
Volume10
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 6 2021
Externally publishedYes

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