Applicability of a high pressure digestion technique to the analysis of sediment and soil samples by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

Wilfredo Diegor*, Henry Longerich, Teofilo Abrajano, Ingo Horn

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    44 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    As inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) expands its role in earth sciences, the concern about incomplete sample digestion remains. To address this problem, the use of high pressure dissolution was examined. High pressure digestion vessels (HPDVs) were fabricated and their use was compared with the existing method used at Memorial University of Newfoundland that utilizes screw top PTFE (STT) jars for digesting reference materials (RMs). ICP-MS analysis of solutions demonstrated more complete digestion of three marine sediment RMs, indicated by higher Y, Zr, Nb, heavy rare-earth element (HREE), Hf, and U concentrations when the HPDV was used. The results indicate better decomposition of resistant minerals, especially zircons that were likely in high abundance in the sediments. To evaluate its suitability to real samples, the method was applied to the ICP-MS analysis of sediment and soil samples from Cebu, Philippines. Good correlation for Nb and Pb, among other elements, was shown by the results from ICP-MS and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Barium recovery was relatively low for ICP-MS, possibly due to particle size difference. Mapping of data showed that the distribution of some elements, particularly the lighter rare-earth elements (REEs), in the soils corresponds to local geology; however, for others such as Zr, Nb, and Pb, results seem to correlate with anthropogenic activity.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)195-207
    Number of pages13
    JournalAnalytica Chimica Acta
    Volume431
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Mar 15 2001

    Keywords

    • High pressure digestion
    • Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry
    • Sediment reference material
    • Sediments
    • Soils
    • Trace elements

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Analytical Chemistry
    • Environmental Chemistry
    • Biochemistry
    • Spectroscopy

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Applicability of a high pressure digestion technique to the analysis of sediment and soil samples by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this