A putative ABC transporter confers durable resistance to multiple fungal pathogens in wheat

Simon G. Krattinger, Evans S. Lagudah, Wolfgang Spielmeyer, Ravi P. Singh, Julio Huerta-Espino, Helen McFadden, Eligio Bossolini, Liselotte L. Selter, Beat Keller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

722 Scopus citations

Abstract

Agricultural crops benefit from resistance to pathogens that endures over years and generations of both pest and crop. Durable disease resistance, which may be partial or complete, can be controlled by several genes. Some of the most devastating fungal pathogens in wheat are leaf rust, stripe rust, and powdery mildew. The wheat gene Lr34 has supported resistance to these pathogens for more than 50 years. Lr34 is now shared by wheat cultivars around the world. Here, we show that the LR34 protein resembles adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters of the pleiotropic drug resistance subfamily. Alleles of Lr34 conferring resistance or susceptibility differ by three genetic polymorphisms. The Lr34 gene, which functions in the adult plant, stimulates senescence-like processes in the flag leaf tips and edges.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1360-1363
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume323
Issue number5919
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 18 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A putative ABC transporter confers durable resistance to multiple fungal pathogens in wheat'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this