A nairovirus isolated from African bats causes haemorrhagic gastroenteritis and severe hepatic disease in mice

Akihiro Ishii*, Keisuke Ueno, Yasuko Orba, Michihito Sasaki, Ladslav Moonga, Bernard M. Hang'Ombe, Aaron S. Mweene, Takashi Umemura, Kimihito Ito, William W. Hall, Hirofumi Sawa

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Bats can carry important zoonotic pathogens. Here we use a combination of next-generation sequencing and classical virus isolation methods to identify novel nairoviruses from bats captured from a cave in Zambia. This nairovirus infection is highly prevalent among giant leaf-nosed bats, Hipposideros gigas (detected in samples from 16 individuals out of 38). Whole-genome analysis of three viral isolates (11SB17, 11SB19 and 11SB23) reveals a typical bunyavirus tri-segmented genome. The strains form a single phylogenetic clade that is divergent from other known nairoviruses, and are hereafter designated as Leopards Hill virus (LPHV). When i.p. injected into mice, the 11SB17 strain causes only slight body weight loss, whereas 11SB23 produces acute and lethal disease closely resembling that observed with Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever virus in humans. We believe that our LPHV mouse model will be useful for research on the pathogenesis of nairoviral haemorrhagic disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number6651
JournalNature Communications
Volume5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Medicine(all)

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