A critical role for System A amino acid transport in the regulation of dendritic development by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)

Julia Burkhalter, Hubert Fiumelli, Jeffrey D. Erickson, Jean Luc Martin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dendritic development is essential for the establishment of a functional nervous system. Among factors that control dendritic development, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to regulate dendritic length and complexity of cortical neurons. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie these effects remain poorly understood. In this study, we examined the role of amino acid transport in mediating the effects of BDNF on dendritic development. We show that BDNF increases System A amino acid transport in cortical neurons by selective up-regulation of the sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter (SNAT)1. Up-regulation of SNAT1 expression and System A activity is required for the effects of BDNF on dendritic growth and branching of cortical neurons. Further analysis revealed that induction of SNAT1 expression and System A activity by BDNF is necessary in particular to enhance synthesis of tissue-type plasminogen activator, a protein that we demonstrate to be essential for the effects of BDNF on cortical dendritic morphology. Together, these data reveal that stimulation of neuronal differentiation by BDNF requires the up-regulation of SNAT1 expression and System A amino acid transport to meet the increased metabolic demand associated with the enhancement of dendritic growth and branching.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5152-5159
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume282
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 23 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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