A cascade of histone modifications induces chromatin condensation in mitosis

Bryan J. Wilkins, Nils A. Rall, Yogesh Ostwal, Tom Kruitwagen, Kyoko Hiragami-Hamada, Marco Winkler, Yves Barral, Wolfgang Fischle, Heinz Neumann*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

143 Scopus citations

Abstract

Metaphase chromosomes are visible hallmarks of mitosis, yet our understanding of their structure and of the forces shaping them is rudimentary. Phosphorylation of histone H3 serine 10 (H3 S10) by Aurora B kinase is a signature event of mitosis, but its function in chromatin condensation is unclear. Using genetically encoded ultraviolet light-inducible cross-linkers, we monitored protein-protein interactions with spatiotemporal resolution in living yeast to identify the molecular details of the pathway downstream of H3 S10 phosphorylation. This modification leads to the recruitment of the histone deacetylase Hst2p that subsequently removes an acetyl group from histone H4 lysine 16, freeing the H4 tail to interact with the surface of neighboring nucleosomes and promoting fiber condensation. This cascade of events provides a condensin-independent driving force of chromatin hypercondensation during mitosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-80
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume343
Issue number6166
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A cascade of histone modifications induces chromatin condensation in mitosis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this